The Broadcaster

Meeting outdoors safer than indoors during pandemic say experts

Women in masks take a walk with their dogs. If in the same household, being near each other is okay, but stay away from others. (Gustavo Fring)

Maeve Reiter, Reporter

May 30, 2020

The risk of outdoor transmission of COVID-19 is lower than indoor, according to experts. When meeting outside, even if someone is infected, dilution will occur. Dilution happens when the wind scatters the virus. While it may expose nearby people, it will be in much smaller quantities. The small...

Will There Be A Second Wave of COVID-19?

Mia Bertoldi and Madeline Smith

May 21, 2020

Since the beginning of the coronavirus outbreak, the possibility of a second wave hitting the US has been a heavily discussed topic even as we “bend the curve.” But is a second wave actually a possibility? In an NPR interview with Dr. Ali Khan, former director of the Office of Public Health Prepa...

Anti-Mask Protesters Cause Backlash Over Anti-Science Stance

Lt. Cmdr. Nevin Yazici demonstrates how to properly fit an N95 respiratory protective device aboard the hospital ship USNS Comfort in New York harbor on March 31, 2020.  The N95 mask or any mask must fit tightly against the face to offer protection.  (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sara Eshleman/CC BY 2.0)

Julia Grenoble, Reporter

May 11, 2020

While health experts from all around the world are encouraging people to wear a mask in public settings, many people are pushing back to express their individual rights and beliefs. It is important that people understand the science behind the masks, to comprehend why they are so important. Most scientist...

World Health Organization Unsure if Infected Patients Have Immunity to Virus

A Combat Medic Specialist from Queens, N.Y., assigned to the New York Army National Guard, secures a swab used to test for COVID-19 infection in Brooklyn, N.Y., April 20, 2020. COVID-19 testing is becoming more advanced in hopes to aid in reopening society. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Sean Madden)

Mia Bertoldi, Reporter

May 7, 2020

The World Health Organization (WHO) claims they have no evidence if COVID-19 patients build up enough immunity to stop them from getting sick again in the future, a top doctor there has admitted.  This cautions against governments that are considering issuing "immunity passports" to people who have h...

COVID-19 Affects Energy Sector, Climate

Eva Baker, Reporter

May 7, 2020

According to a study by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), there has been about a 30% decrease of nitrogen dioxide, a byproduct from burning fossil fuels.  COVID-19 has affected more than just the health of the general public; it has also affected the energy sector. As more peo...

Possible New Treatment for Serious COVID-19 cases

Michelle Mendoza, pharmacy technician, reconstitutes the remdesivir research drug under an intravenous hood at Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, April 29, 2020. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)-sponsored study has enrolled hundreds of people across the nation as it looks to determine if the antiviral drug is effective against COVID-19. (U.S. Army photo by Jason W. Edwards)

Maeve Reiter, Reporter

May 6, 2020

The Lancet medical journal conducted a study between February 6 and March 12, 2020, which found that the drug Remdesivir has positive impacts on very sick COVID-19 patients. Remdesivir, described in the study by Lancet as a “nucleoside analogue prodrug,” is a drug that blocks the virus from replicating withi...

Is Favilavir a Miracle Antiviral?

Pictured is an infographic developed by the FDA to explain the drug approval process.  Favilavir has not yet been approved for widespread use for COVID-19.  (US Food and Drug Administration)

Eva Baker, Reporter

April 28, 2020

Favilavir is an antiviral drug used in China and Japan to treat influenza. It was also approved for treating COVID-19 by China’s National Medical Products Administration.  But is it a short-term solution to fight COVID-19 while a vaccine is developed? Favilavir is allegedly able to go through i...

CDC Study Finds Coronavirus may be Spread by Air Conditioning

Pictured is a sketch showing arrangement of restaurant tables and air conditioning airflow at site of outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus disease in Guangzhou, China. The red circles indicate seating of individuals who were infected following eating at this restaurant; the individual in yellow was the source of the infection.  (CDC)

Maeve Reiter, Reporter

April 28, 2020

An outbreak of COVID-19 was spread through the air conditioning in a restaurant in Guangzhou, China from January 26th to February 10th, 2020. Based on a study performed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on this experience, the initial family with COVID-19 was seated on a floor in the restaurant near the air conditioner, as w...

Researchers Find Some Risk of Coronavirus Transmission to Animals

Leah Koppenhaver, Editor

April 28, 2020

In recent weeks, eight big cats at the Bronx Zoo and two house cats in New York have tested positive for COVID-19, raising concerns regarding what animals can contract the virus.  Because coronavirus is spreading rapidly among the human population, some animals may contract the virus if they come...

Projections Show Pennsylvania Estimated to Reach Peak Within Next Week

Data shows parts of Pennsylvania with the highest number of coronavirus cases.  Pennsylvania has registered 1,707 deaths due to coronavirus. (PA Department of Health)

Mia Bertoldi, Reporter

April 22, 2020

The University of Washington in Seattle (IHME) released projections on Sunday about peaks in COVID-19 cases across the United States.  Pennsylvania is expected to peak in the next week. The projections estimate that the number of deaths per day peaked on Saturday, April 18th, 2020 with 88 deaths...

How Soap Kills COVID-19

Julia Grenoble, Reporter

April 15, 2020

While there is currently no vaccine to prevent Coronavirus, common soap is able to stop the spread of it. Washing your hands with a simple bar of soap can kill the virus, and it is more effective than most disinfectants and wipes.  According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, the Coronavirus is a self-a...

The Best Materials for DIY Masks, According to Science

Pictured is a three step no-sew method for making a face mask with an old T-shirt published by the CDC.  A DIY face mask is designed to protect those around the wearer from the spread of COVID-19.  (CDC)

Leah Koppenhaver, Sci-Tech Editor

April 10, 2020

After recent suggestions from The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) that all people utilize universal mask-wearing while in public, many ideas have circulated regarding the best way to create a “DIY” mask.  Materials such as bandanas, t-shirts, pillowcases, vacuum filters, and coffee filters...

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